Guest Post: Not Your Momma’s Fundraising — The New Must Have Skill for Fundraisers

Not Your Momma's Fundraising - The New

Graduation season is in full swing, and with it comes an endless parade of advice (solicited and unsolicited) for grads entering the workforce.

For fundraisers, much of this advice centers on relationship building and the art of conversation. Good skills to master for aspiring fundraisers, to be sure.

But in our connected society, there’s an often overlooked skill that can help the new generation of fundraisers conquer the brave new world of online fundraising.

That skill? Data-crunching.

Check out this SlideShare presentation from WeDidIt that explores this new, in-demand skill, and what actions fundraisers can take to be P.D.D.D. (“Pretty Damn Data-Driven”).

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Written by Andrew Littlefield

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Andrew is a marketer and nonprofit fan for WeDidIt, a startup based in Brooklyn, New York dedicated to helping nonprofits raise more money and reach new donors.

Connect with Andrew via:
Twitter |  WeDidIt Blog

Guest Post: The Efficient “Chief Everything Officer”

the efficient -chief everything officer-

Are you the “Chief Everything Officer” at your nonprofit? Are you in charge of fundraising, communications, event planning, grant writing and public relations?  I feel your pain! Once upon a time, so was I.

What can you do to keep yourself from burning out and share the work?

Here’s what worked for me:

  1. Recruit a small army of volunteers – You might already have a volunteer who is passionate about your organization’s work who would gladly help you proofread copy, stuff envelopes, make phone calls, or do a number of tasks to lessen your load. Delegate whatever you can!
  2. Involve your board members – if you have board members that are retired professionals, often they are happy to help with anything, you just have to ask!
  3. Get organized – prioritize tasks weekly, or even daily.  Block out chunks of uninterrupted time to accomplish the top items, then move down the list.  Haven’t called your top donor once since the last gift two months ago? Set aside every Friday morning to make donor phone calls for one hour.  Take that list of your top 20 donors and keep it by your phone!

It CAN be done!

Wishing you abundance and success!

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Written by Ayda Sanver, MBA, CFRE

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Ayda runs Ayda Sanver Consulting, LLC, and she is also the author of “Tag, You’re IT – Now Raise Us Some Money”.

Connect with Ayda via:
Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Guest Post: 3 Things Every Fundraiser Should Know About Planned Giving

3 things every #fundraiser should know

  1. 1.5 Million Canadians have left a gift to a charity in their will. Planned giving is growing as a more and more accepted and celebrated way for donors to make a difference in the causes they care about.
  2. Bequest giving is one of the biggest revenue growth opportunities in today’s philanthropic market! In the U.S., only 22 percent of people over the age of 30 reportedly say they have been asked to leave a gift in their will. The numbers are similar in Canada! Not enough charities are talking to their donors about planned giving.
  3. You don’t have to be rich to make a big impact with a planned gift! Many large planned gift donations can come from donors who don’t have the capacity to make a major gift while they are alive. Your annual donors are a great place to uncover transformational planned gifts.

If you really care about your cause, and your donor’s desire to make a lasting impact in your work, then you need to make sure you are talking to them about planned giving.

But how?

Well, that’s exactly what Fraser Green is going to tell you in his upcoming webinar: 32 Proven Legacy Gift Persuasion Tips. This webinar is all about planned giving secrets to raise more money.

Fraser Green has been exploring the mind of the legacy donor since 2003. He knows how they give. He knows when they give. And – most importantly – he knows WHY they give. And now he’s going to share his best tips with you.

In just one hour, Fraser will share 32 practical tips that will allow you to say the right things the right ways to persuade your donors to leave you gifts in their wills. If you miss this webinar, you’re leaving money on the table!

Sign up today to take advantage of this special deal! Only $24.99!

Register here: https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/3365735201266896897

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Written by Rory Green

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Rory is a Senior Development Officer by day, and FundraiserGrrl by night. As a major gifts fundraiser, she connects donors with an opportunity to invest in a better future. FundraiserGrrrl is a blog about her cheeky observations about life in fundraising.

Connect with Rory via:
Twitter

 

 

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**SPONSORED POST** Email maeve@whatgivesphilanthropy.com for more information about advertising on www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com.

Guest Post: What is “loverizing”?

what is loverizing-

Loverizing means reflecting on the emotional journey between you and your beloved. Yes, your donors!

What was that first meeting of your new love like? Was it flowers and chocolate? Intense conversations about the things that mean the most to you both?

What happened next?

During the second and third dates—what stories did you share? Did she stare deeply in your eyes and nod along and share her own angst, frustration, desire to help out—or did she check her Facebook?

When was the last time you brought her flowers? Just because…

When is it time to go steady? What signs does she give you that she is ready for a longer commitment?

As time passes, does it seem like the love and respect you have for one another grow and go deeper? How do you know that you share the same core, personal values?

Are you ready to take the walk down the aisle and spend the rest of your days together—‘til death do you part?

Are you still following along?

Good donor care is a romance, a courtship. It is a conversation, a dialogue.

Folks, this is no longer about ROI, process and report writing.

Loving your donors is a lot like loving the other humans in your life. It takes time, respect, surprise and delight, adventure and love.

Hopefully you can join us, Agent John and Agent Jen, on May 13th, to talk about “loverizing” your donors. We will discuss the 6 key principles of donor love, with a specific activity you can use right now to put it into action. And then we’ll share integrated campaigns that you can steal today to raise more money tomorrow.

Hope you can join us, Lovers! Click here to register for the webinar – How to Loverize your Donors with Direct Response: Secrets to Boost your Revenue.

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Written by John Lepp & Jen Love


John and Jen are the Agents of Good.

Connect with John & Jen via:
@johnlepp | @agentjenlove | Web

 
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**SPONSORED POST** Email maeve@whatgivesphilanthropy.com for more information about advertising on www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com.

Guest Post: Five Must-Haves for Online Fundraising Success

Almost every nonprofit organization has embraced the Internet to help spread awareness for their cause, gain supporters, and raise money through online donations. When looking at the online fundraising campaigns that achieve the greatest success, they seem to include five critical elements.

  1. Enhance Digital Efforts & Go Mobile
    People are spending a greater amount of time online each year. In fact, over 11 billion searches are conducted each month on Google alone. Just like any business with an online presence, your organization not only needs a website, but it should include some important elements: simple, clear messaging, easy navigation, and, with more than 80% of internet users also using a smart phone, mobile optimization is key. By using fundraising software, such as DoJiggy, you can easily build a mobile-optimized fundraising website to manage all details for your fundraising event including: registration & ticket sales, collecting online donations, progress tracking and reporting.
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  2. Pay More Attention to Social Media
    Today more than 55% of Americans have social media profiles presenting a unique opportunity for the non-profit sector. Social media gives nonprofits an easy way to reach out to their donors, build and nurture relationships, and communicate news and updates. Facebook and Twitter are staples in the non-profit world. But remember it’s not just being present…it’s engaging. Don’t just post about your own charity, but find other organizations doing similar things and help them spread the word – retweet, share their posts, and chances are they’ll return the favor. Don’t forget about other networks that are rapidly growing, like Instagram and Pinterest which give you a unique opportunity to share visual imagery and attract more people to your cause. LinkedIn and Google Plus are also great ways to connect with other communities and talk to your peers.

  3. Communication Tactics to Engage with Different Generations
    When thinking about communication efforts, be sure to consider how your message will reach different generations. Some older donors may prefer letters sent in the mail, email newsletter updates, or personal phone calls. Keep in mind that in just a few short years, Millennials will make up the largest portion of the workforce, thus controlling a large portion of funds, and therefore will be critical to your fundraising success.  This generation relies heavily on the information they find on the Internet. They engage via social channels so be sure to have a presence here and give them the tools they need to share. They also look for organizations to be open and transparent, so including testimonials could be a nice tactic.pic2
  4. Free Online Resources for Participants
    In this day and age where information is so accessible, people are always looking online for help. By offering helpful fundraising resources to your supporters, you not only show them you care, but you can actually help them perform better – which results in greater success for your charity. Offer fundraising check-lists and timelines to help them plan. Offer tips for soliciting donations or sample donation request letters. Post short videos that explain more about the cause and give them sample pitches to use so they are prepared when they seek donations. You can even offer some stock images for people to use in their social posts or sample “tweets” for them to simply copy and paste when sharing your message.
  5. Analyze Metrics & Make Improvements
    Evaluation has always been an important part of any fundraising campaign. Yet, finding actual statistics used to be much more of a challenge. People distributed surveys or estimated attendance for events. Today data is easier to come by than ever before. Using tracking and analytics tools, like those included with DoJiggy’s fundraising software, allow your organization to better understand your donors and the results of your fundraising efforts. Did more donations come in from email campaigns, social sharing, from sponsor sites or blog posts? You can also use data to find out what your prospects are interested in. By looking at Social media, you can see which posts get the most engagement, likes, and clicks. Use this information to help with your future branding and messaging.

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Written by Kari Kiel

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Kari Kiel is the Marketing Director at DoJiggy – a company that’s been providing affordable, easy-to-use online fundraising software solutions for nonprofits, schools, churches & community organizations for more than a decade. www.DoJiggy.com

 

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**SPONSORED POST** Email maeve@whatgivesphilanthropy.com for more information about advertising on www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com.

Guest Post: 11 things I learned about fundraising/philanthropy when I fell into the field temporarily

11 things I learned about fundraising-philanthropy when I fell into the field temporarily

  1. There are people who actually enjoy asking others for money

  1. Fundraisers WANT to help people help others

  1. There is an art form to fundraising

  1. Prospect researchers remember EVERYTHING about donors

  1. Apparently, the most successful solicitations are long, story-based letters sent in the mail… who knew?

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  1. Non-profits are desperately trying to figure out young donors

  1. Every donor communication needs to have an ask

  1. Scholarships, research, etc.… all the great work non-profits do for communities doesn’t just happen out of thin air. There are teams of people working hard everyday to help people achieve their goals

  1. There are major debates about seemingly minor word choices in solicitations

  1. Who needs Christmas when December 31 is the best fundraising day of all year!

  1. Fundraisers really really like what they do!

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Written by Kimberly Elworthy

VR6X0087_1Kimberly is a communications specialist, and recently worked in fundraising and alumni relations for 18 months. She is currently on the Board of Directors for the Grand River Film Festival. (Click here for more).

Connect with Kimberly via:
Twitter | LinkedIn

Guest Post: The #1 Mistake Online Fundraisers Make

There is nothing more frustrating than not hitting a goal you’ve set. Especially when it comes to fundraising.

You start dreaming big and thinking of all the things you’ll do with the hundreds of thousands of dollars you’ll raise.

Then when you miss that goal, you feel like you’ve failed. Worse yet, you feel like you’ve let down the folks who actually did donate.

That’s not a good feeling.

Many times, missing a goal comes down to one thing: setting unrealistic goals.

What’s Realistic?

The most successful online fundraisers have two things going for them: strong online assets, and a plan to promote their campaign using those assets.

Through my job at WeDidIt, I’ve been able to look at the lots of successful crowdfunding pages and their traffic statistics.

I learned that a campaign’s performance is predictable. I can look at a page’s traffic and give you an idea of where each of those visitors came from (email, Facebook, Google, your organization’s website, etc).

Better yet: I can tell you how much money it probably raised.

It’s a great party trick. If the party you’re at is full of nonprofit people…

How I Do It

It’s all about averages.

By taking the total amount raised and dividing that by the total traffic a page received, we can get a dollars per visit value (how much, on average, each page visit is worth). This figure works out to $9/visit (it’s actually more, but I round down to be conservative).

We can reverse engineer this to figure out how much traffic your page needs to generate to raise a specific amount.

Want to raise $1000?

$1000 / $9 = 111 visits to the page. You’ll need at least that much to make it happen.

On average, here’s where that traffic comes from:

  • Email: 56%
  • Facebook: 25%
  • Your website: 10%
  • Search: 5%
  • Twitter: 3%
  • Other: 1%

Right away, you can see email is the biggest driver of traffic.

It makes sense then to set your goal based on how healthy your email list is.

If your email list is small or has a low open/click rate, setting a huge crowdfunding goal is not realistic.

For example:

If you want to raise $15,000, you’ll need about 1670 visits. 56% of those have to come from your email list, or 935. That means 935 people on your email list have to open the email and click the link to the page.

If your email list is 10,000 addresses strong, you’re in good shape!

If it’s 500 addresses…you get the idea.

Just as you would run a 5K before taking on an IronMan race, setting realistic crowdfunding goals helps you experience more success and have something to build on.

If you’re interested in those crowdfunding stats, I put together a handy little tool I call the Crowdfunding Calculator. It allows you to plug in how much you want to raise, then breaks down how much traffic you’ll need, where it needs to come from, and gives you an idea of whether your online assets are strong enough to support that goal.

I offer it for free to the nonprofit community, all I ask for in return is that you tell me what your biggest fundraising headache is (so I can get ideas for a my next tool to make!). Click here to check it out!

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Written by Andrew Littlefield

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Andrew is a marketer and nonprofit fan for WeDidIt, a startup based in Brooklyn, New York dedicated to helping nonprofits raise more money and reach new donors.

Connect with Andrew via:
Twitter |  WeDidIt Blog

Guest Post: 5 TED Talks all Non-profit Leaders Should Watch

5 TED Talks All Non-Profit Leaders Should

I’ve been talking and writing a lot about leadership lately. It’s a topic I am incredibly passionate about – because we are never going to raise the money we need to raise if we don’t have good leaders who inspire their teams.

Regardless of our age, or experience level – we all need to spend as much time learning about leadership as we do fundraising.

With that in mind, here are my top 5 favourite TED talks that I think every non-profit leader (present and future) should watch:

  1. Simon Sinek: Why good leaders make you feel safe I am a HUGE fan of Simon Sinek. You probably know him from his book “Start With Why” – but it is this talk on the role of a leader that resonated with me. In 12 minutes, this TED talk succinctly summarized one huge problem with working in the non-profit world – we need to feel safe in our jobs to be truly successful.

“Great leaders are willing to sacrifice the numbers to save the people. Poor leaders sacrifice the people to save the numbers.” –Simon Sinek

  1. Dan Ariely: What makes us feel good about our work? What makes employees happy at work? Feeling like the work they are doing is making a difference. We need that to feel fulfilled in the work we do. IN FACT using salary to incentivise performance often has the exact opposite effect you want it to. Frankly, this is a video I wish I could force all fundraising directors, EDs and CEOs to watch Clockwork Orange style.

“There’s a mismatch between what science knows and what business does”
–Dan Ariely
   

  1. Susan Cain: The power of introverts In a world where many charities treat major gifts like it is the best kind of fundraising, Susan Cain’s messages are bang on for our sector.

“I worry that there are people who are put in positions of authority because they’re good talkers, but they don’t have good ideas. It’s so easy to confuse schmoozing ability with talent. Someone seems like a good presenter, easy to get along with, and those traits are rewarded. Well, why is that? They’re valuable traits, but we put too much of a premium on presenting and not enough on substance and critical thinking.” –Susan Cain

  1. Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen! How often does ego get in the way of good leadership? Too often in this fundraiser’s opinion. Being a great leader means you need to have the confidence to be vulnerable and LISTEN to your team.

“Nobody in this world can succeed alone” –Ernesto Sirolli

  1. Michael Norton: Money can buy happiness This TED talk has another powerful lesson on how to have happy, high performing teams: don’t spend money ON you team members – let them spend money helping each other.

“Teams that are pro-social sell more stuff” –Michael Norton

You’ll notice Dan Pallotta’s The way we think about charity is dead wrong isn’t on the list. Why? If you haven’t seen this TED talk, you may be living under a rock and I’m not sure this blog can help you. Just kidding, if you haven’t seen this one, it is also a must-watch.

That’s my list! What’s yours? Share your favourite TED Talk you think all non-profit leaders should watch in the comments below.

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Written by Rory Green

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Rory is a Senior Development Officer by day, and FundraiserGrrl by night. As a major gifts fundraiser, she connects donors with an opportunity to invest in a better future. FundraiserGrrrl is a blog about her cheeky observations about life in fundraising.

Guest post: 5 Reasons Why Society Needs Charitable Trusts

You’ve probably heard a lot about charitable organizations and foundations, but perhaps you don’t know much about charitable trusts. Put in the simplest terms, a charitable trust is an irrevocable arrangement whereby one person gives real or personal property to another to be used for the benefit of a class of persons or the general public.

In the United States, charitable trusts come in two basic varieties: remainder trusts and lead trusts.

  • Remainder trust: Assets are signed over to a charitable organization for a specific period of time that can be either a few years or many years after the death of the donor(s). After the specified period of time has elapsed, the assets become the property of the charity, along with any interest or profits that might have been generated. One example of a remainder trust is the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Trust, set to expire 50 years after the deaths of Bill and Melinda Gates. With more than $30 billion in assets it is currently the largest charitable trust in the world.
  • Lead trust: The donor retains control over the trust properties rather than giving control to a charity. Interest from the trust’s assets can either go to the charity or be split between the charity and the donor’s beneficiaries. When the trust expires, the charity doesn’t gain control; rather, the trust property reverts back to a party of the donor’s choosing (usually heirs or designated beneficiaries).

Other countries also have charitable trusts, including the United Kingdom and India. Charitable trusts can provide significant tax breaks for donors, but they are also good for society. Here are five ways society benefits from charitable trusts:

  1. They save lives in crisis areas of the world. It’s not much of an exaggeration to speculate that the survival of much of the human race could at some point depend upon the work of charitable trusts. The aforementioned Gates Foundation oversees a diverse range of projects in high-poverty areas of the world, helping with programs to ensure access to clean water (an issue that is predicted to reach a true global crisis point within a few decades); vaccinations against deadly diseases; and famine relief.
  2. They provide disaster and war relief. The world’s weather and other natural events seem to be getting more extreme, and whether all of that is just part of a natural cycle or is due to human factors, the fact remains that we’re seeing more catastrophic floods, fires, earthquakes and tsunamis. And then there are “wars and rumors of wars.” All of these events are devastating to many thousands of people every year, and those who don’t lose their lives often lose everything but their lives. They desperately need help, and the Red Cross can’t do everything (in fact, it depends upon help from charitable trusts as well as from other sources). Organizations such as CVS Caremark Charitable Trust are there to lend a hand.
  3. They help people help themselves. “Give a man a fish and he eats for a day; teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime.” The Gates Foundation and other charitable trusts help people help themselves by overseeing a range of programs from micro-financing loans that help people in impoverished areas start small businesses, to sustainable agriculture programs.
  4. They support education. Even in the less impoverished areas of the world, charitable trusts add to the quality of life for millions of people of all ages. For instance, the Pew Charitable Trusts and MacArthur Foundations, as well as numerous other charitable organizations, have been funding quality (educational) television programming on PBS in the United States for decades.
  5. They support the arts. Some contend that once the basics of survival are covered, the arts are what make life worth living. Charitable trusts such as the J. Paul Getty Trust – worth more than $10 billion – fund arts programs all over the world. The Getty Trust also funds A.’s renowned Getty Museum.

No matter where the trust is established, it must fulfill certain legal requirements in order to qualify as a charitable trust. In the United States, for instance, the settlor (the person who is establishing the trust) must have a clear intention to create this type of trust. There must be a trustee to administer the trust, and the trust must consist of some type of property, known as res. The charitable purpose must be clearly defined, the class of persons (though not the individuals) included in the beneficiaries must be expressly designated, and the beneficiaries must actually receive the benefit. Similar requirements apply in the United Kingdom and elsewhere.

As may be evident, there is a lot of accountability with a charitable trust, as there should be. But if you have the assets and you want to contribute to the “greater good” in some tangible way, a charitable trust might be just the vehicle to consider. If you don’t have the assets, consider volunteering or applying for a paid position with a trust whose mission interests you.

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Written by Daphne Holmes

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Daphne is a writer from http://www.arrestrecords.com.

Connect with Daphne via:
Email

Customization vs. Personalization

Customizationvs.Personalization

Happy New Year, readers! I hope 2015 brings you great things!

Now, for the first post of the new year, starting with an important question:

Why do donors keep giving to a cause? Because we make them feel special! 

That’s a simple reason, but it’s true!

How do we make them feel special? I’ll tell you one way we wouldn’t make them feel special: if they gave us $1,000 and we wrote a thank you letter to them that said “Dear Friend…”. No! That was part of a long-gone era of fundraising; what Fraser Green would call the “Industrial Age of Fundraising”. We’re now in what Mr. Green would call the “Post-Industrial Age” of Fundraising. The idea of pumping out a million things that look exactly the same – case in point: thank you letters written to the same “Friend” – don’t appeal to our donors. What do we do? We customize.

So our thank you letter now – thanks to mail merge – starts with “Dear Jane…”. Satisfied? YES!

NO!!! I sat down with an acquaintance recently and he commented on a fundraising video he’d received from his alma mater. It was innovative, it was different, and it was customized! The email he’d received had a subject line with his name in it! The body of the email had his name in it! The video had his name in it! I was rejoicing! Great work, alma mater!

You know what he said? It creeped him out. Why?! I asked, full of despair! He said that all that video told him was that his alma mater paid a lot of money to a video company and that they had a database full of information about him. That’s when I realized:

It was customized, but it wasn’t personal.

We’re past the age of customization. Having the technology to insert someone’s first name into something is no longer innovative. Taking the time to write a personal note, acknowledge something specific to a donor, hand-address an envelope… that shows something. It’s not necessarily innovative, in fact it’s pretty old school, and that’s why it’ll cut through the rest.

What do you think???

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in educational fundraising for the past seven years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email