What did Steve Jobs have to say about fundraising?

What did Steve Jobs have to say about fundraising-

Curated choice. 

I said this in a meeting with a client recently and my boss seemed to really like the phrase.

Anything she likes, I like, so I’ll say it again.

Curated choice.

That’s what Steve Jobs had to say about fundraising.

Although, he wasn’t specifically saying it about fundraising… and he may not have said it at all. But that’s what I learned from him.

Have you ever heard of Steve Jobs’ product matrix? Or Apple’s “Four Quadrant Product Grid”?

I’m not sure what to call it, but it looks like this:

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Without having done too much research on it, and just recalling from my memory, this grid represents Steve Jobs’ simple – yet brilliant – approach to products.

He wanted to give customers choice. But not too much choice. 

If they were looking for a work computer, they could get one… of two. Either a portable one, or a desktop one.

If their computer purchase was for personal use, they had choices! Just two choices: the iMac or the iBook.

It’s so beautifully simple. And it’s so important to business, whatever your business is.

Do you ever go to the pharmacy and get overwhelmed? I do! My girlfriend goes to Shoppers Drug Mart for me (the popular Canadian pharmacy) because when I go there and I walk down the shampoo aisle, for example, my eyes get blurry, I get overwhelmed, and I want to leave.

Why?

There’s too many choices! How the heck am I supposed to pick a shampoo?!

Then again, what if there was just one shampoo brand? I’d feel cheated! I’d have no agency. I wouldn’t really be making a choice; the choice would be made for me.

But what if there was a happy medium? A situation that felt – as Goldilocks would put it – just right?

That’s what Steve Jobs’ product matrix is about. Enough choice to feel like you’re making a decision, like you have agency, but not too much that it makes you feel overwhelmed.

Curated choice.

So how does that apply to fundraising?

Well let me take you back to that client meeting I was talking about. The client was really keen to move their mid-level donors to monthly giving, for consistency of revenue, to streamline renewal processes, etc. It was a sound desire, but my boss was saying that we can’t just pull the rug out from under these donors and give them only a monthly giving option.

What we had to do instead was two things.

First, we need to stop thinking about why WE want donors to start giving monthly, even though it’s reasonable, and instead think about why they could want to give monthly. And not those administrative reasons, and not even reasons having to do with ease, convenience, etc. The reasons have to be inspiring. They have to be donor-centred.

Second, we need to offer the donor – you guessed it:

Curated choice.

It’s our job to make the case for monthly giving, and then sit back and let the donor decide. In this case, the curated choices are likely to be monthly vs. one-time giving.

Don’t go crazy adding in quarterly giving options or anything like that. Keep it simple.

How do YOU offer curated choice? Let me know in the comments!

~~

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over nine years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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Why do donors give so little?

why do donors give so little-

I heard Mark Phillips talk about this once and I want to wax philosophical on it for a few minutes.

We seem to hear year after year from research like what Penelope Burk does that donors didn’t feel they gave as much to charity as they could the year before.

Why is this?

Put simply: We’re not asking enough of our donors.

We’re not asking them often enough. We’re not asking them for enough money. We’re not giving them enough ways to engage with us more deeply.

On the point of not asking donors for enough money, Mark has a great illustration of this.

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Why do donors give so little? Because we ask them to.

Now don’t think for one second that I don’t think every gift is important, that every donor is important, or that every person who supports a cause with a dollar a day is stupid.

I value all donors.

But we have been part of this misconception that that’s what charity costs: a dollar a day. That’s all a donor needs to give to make a difference and feel engaged.

We have been doing ourselves – and donors! – a disservice by perpetuating this falsehood.

And when it comes to mid-level donors – or potential mid-level donors – who you know I love talking about, this is part of the reason why we have disengaged and uninspired donors in the middle: because we aren’t giving them a special enough opportunity to engage with us.

We aren’t inspiring them with a big problem for them to solve through a big investment.

Donors give us a lot and they are so amazing and we are so grateful.

However, donors seem to be telling us that they aren’t giving as much as they can.

So let’s find ways to inspire a new level of giving among our donors.

And then steward the hell out of ’em so they know how much they mean to us.

~~

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over nine years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email

4 things I learned at #AFPFC

4 things I learned at #AFPFC

I’m back from AFPFC a.k.a. the Association of Fundraising Professionals International Fundraising Conference, and I’m ready to share with you my top learnings.

Take little bets.

Take little bets. What I loved about a lot of the sessions I went to was that the presenters looked at the small ways we can innovate, make change, and show #DonorLove. In Steven Shattuck‘s session The Art and Science of Retaining Digital Donors, he talked about 3 opportunities to thank, engage, and – as a result – retain digital donors.

  1. Through the “Thank You Page” a.k.a. the webpage donors land on after successfully making an online donation.
  2. Through the confirmation email a.k.a. the “receipt” we send donors after they make an online gift.
  3. Through the formal acknowledgement we send them later.

Mark Rovner also took this approach in his session called Why midlevel donors are sweeter than Christmas morning, which I sadly wasn’t able to attend since I had to head to the airport, but which I followed on Twitter. Mark shared 3 great tactics to show mid-level donors some #DonorLove.

  1. Put your business card in their donor welcome package.
  2. Pick up the phone [and call her/him].
  3. Send him/her a handwritten note.

Get donors to DO something.

Get donors to DO something. Steven Shattuck talked about this in his session, too. When donors land on your Thank You Page, for example, does it just have a nice (or not so nice) message they can read (or not read) before just clicking the “X” and forgetting about you? OR do you give them a way to further engage with you?

A company called Abila in their session Digging Deeper Into Donor Behavior & Preferences: 2016 Donor Engagement Study, shared some recommendations on how to do this:

  1. Through a short video (2 minutes max.).
  2. Through a short note or article.
  3. Through a short Facebook post.

(See a pattern? It must be short!)

-If you always do what you've always done, you'll always be who you've always been.-

Fundraising = Impact Investing. Fundraising as investing is not a new idea to me, or to any of you, I’m sure, but it was definitely discussed a lot at AFPFC. It was discussed quite a bit in the Tuesday general session, and it was a big chunk of Kay Sprinkel Grace‘s amazing session: Where is the Sector Headed?. Kay urged us all to be nimble and to take risks. People are sick of giving to charities when they could give through venture philanthropy and make a bigger, more direct impact faster. We’re seen as a sector focused on scarcity, and nobody wants to give to a desperate organization. They want to give to a winning organization! We need to make change if we want to “win”!

Don’t be a bad houseguest. After many years of admiring him from afar, I finally got to see Tom Ahern speak in real time/real life in his session titled “Loverizing”: The Lucrative Difference a Few Well-Chosen Words Will Make in Your Donor Communications. Tom inspired the audience in so many ways, but a quote that really resonated with me was:

-A lot of charities could be mistaken for egotistical maniacs.- - Tom Ahern

Tom asked us to think about it like we’re a guest in a donor’s home, even when we send them direct mail. Do we want to go to their house and talk about US – the charity – non-stop? We did this, we did that, we we weOR do we want to talk about them and how great they – the donor – are? I think the latter.

Thanks for reading!

~~

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over nine years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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Guest Post: Three Strategies to Improve Donor Retention

3 strategies to improve donor retention

The truth of the matter is, there isn’t one fundraising metric to hold high above the rest. The evaluation is holistic.

The challenge with tracking metrics is that our limited time and resources are being funnelled towards development, marketing, program services, and other important endeavours.

Additionally, no organization’s data is perfect. To ensure accuracy, your nonprofit is going to have to clean the data in your CRM prior to delving into performance analysis.

All that being said, metrics are still extremely important. To make the most of when you do study up, strategically map out which metrics make the most sense for your nonprofit with an eye for metrics that address numerous potential pain points at once.

Donor retention rate is one such metric.

From finding faults in your stewardship process to recognizing that your acquisition efforts carry too much of the workload, a poor donor retention rate says a lot.

Acquiring a first-time gift costs roughly five times more than it does to retain a donor. Couple that with the fact that The Fundraising Effectiveness Project found that increasing donor retention rate from 45% to 55% has the potential to double an organization’s donation revenue, and there’s no fiscal argument against solidifying your nonprofit’s retention strategies.

The strongest indicator of future giving is past giving. Leverage that opportunity!

So how do we do this? You surely have standard retention-related stewardship policies in place (drip email campaigns, acknowledgment techniques, etc.), but you’ll have to think creatively to kickstart your retention. Let’s close out by offering a few retention strategies to add to your pre-existing processes.

#1 — Promote matching gifts.

Almost two-thirds of Fortune 500 companies have matching gift programs. These programs match donations made by employees to a wide range of nonprofits. The matches often double the original donation size which is a huge boon for your nonprofit.

In terms of retention, donors who know that their gift size can grow through very little effort on their part are going to be inclined to give again and again.

Donation impact is critical; stress how impactful one gift can be!

#2 — Research your donors.

You can benefit from turning the prospect research microscope toward your donor pool.

A screening fills in gaps regarding both the financial situation and philanthropic interests of your donors. Take advantage of the opportunity to learn more so you can segment your donor pool for better, personalized stewardship practices.

#3 — Engage with donors without asking for more money.

Hopefully, this item is already on your list. But it warrants emphasizing that donors are cause advocates and not piggy banks.

Give donors opportunities to contribute in non-financial ways. Those are powerful, firsthand experiences that stick with supporters, influencing their decisions to donate more later.

Next time you study your data, ask yourself — what are we doing to make our donor retention dreams a reality?

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Written by Blake Groves

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With more than 20 years in technology solutions and consulting, Blake has knowledge of sales, consulting, product management and marketing. For the last 10 years, he has narrowed his focus to how Internet technologies can help nonprofit organizations, and prior to joining Salsa, he held positions at Convio and Charity Dynamics.

Connect with Blake via:
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Guest Post: How to Turn Your Words into Money – A Book Review

How to Turn Your Words Into Money - A Book Review (1)

I am not a great writer.  If I am being super honest, even writing this book review caused me a bit of stress. That is why I am so grateful for Jeff Brooks.

Do you know Jeff? He’s the smarty-pants behind Future Fundraising Now, and the author of some pretty awesome books – and his newest book, How to Turn Your Words Into Money: The Master Fundraiser’s Guide to Persuasive Writing, breaks down step by step exactly what you need to do (and NOT do) to write fundraising copy that makes donors want to give..

The book has great practical tips (more on that in a second) – but one of my favourite things Jeff does is little “what not to do” and “what to do” before & after style examples throughout. I found them to be super-duper helpful. Here’s one example….

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So, what did I learn? For me the book boils down to this:

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Audience is everything: Know your audience (donors), think about your audience (donors), love your audience (donors). Make content for your audience (donors) and no one else  – not your CEO, not your board and not yourself!

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Giving is beautiful: Understand what giving does for the GIVER (the donor) not just what the gift does for the beneficiaries. Giving feels really good! And guess what?? That means that fundraising isn’t begging or annoying. When done right donors love well-written fundraising copy.

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The Donor is the Hero: Writing fundraising copy well means putting the donor at the heart of your good work. Talk about them – what they have accomplished. What the donor has done – and can do – to help others in need.

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Overall this book is easy to read (it only took me a day), incredibly informative and I really believe it will help you raise more money. It’s for sale on Amazon, and we may be giving away a copy or two at the #DonorLove Rendezvous. I promise you it is worth reading.

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Written by Rory Green

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Rory is a Senior Development Officer by day, and FundraiserGrrl by night. As a major gifts fundraiser, she connects donors with an opportunity to invest in a better future. FundraiserGrrrl is a blog about her cheeky observations about life in fundraising.

Connect with Rory via:
Twitter

Maeve’s Top 5 & Happy 4-Year Anniversary, What Gives!

Happy 4-Year Anniversary!Wow… another year gone.

I am so proud to be going into my fifth year writing and editing this blog. For me, it’s been four years of learning, growing, tweaking, improving, reflecting, and feeling inspired.

I hope you have felt inspired, too!

MAEVE'S

To celebrate, I wanted to list my Top 5 Posts. They are in no particular order, and I used no criteria to choose them. Most of them have been more popular among readers, but what they have in common is that I’m proud to have written – or posted – them.

Enjoy! And thanks for making these 4 years so great!

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Young Alumni Fundraising - Part I (2)

5 Ways to Involve Young People In Your Organization

Although #whatgiveswednesdays was a short-lived series of posts about young constituents and how we can engage them and inspire them to give, it still had a lot of gems including this post. In fact, the whole point of this post was to summarize some of the learnings from the series. Check it out for a quick, concise read!

Customizationvs.Personalization

Customization vs. Personalization

You know why I love this post so much? Because John Lepp liked it! When someone I respect likes what I write, it makes me feel especially good about it. It may sound silly, but it’s not. I enjoy the process of writing this blog every week, but of course I write it because I hope it’s valuable to my fellow fundraisers. So I feel proud about this post because it resonated with John Lepp. It’s all about the difference between customizing (i.e. mail merge) and personalizing (i.e. taking the time to handwrite a thank you note to a donor). Key distinction, and a post I look back on with pride.

Prospect Management at a Cocktail Party for Introverted Fundraisers

Prospect Management at a Cocktail Party for Introverted Fundraisers

One of my most important discoveries as an introvert and a fundraiser is that those things are not mutually exclusive. When I first got into the field, I thought I had a disadvantage as an introvert, but I realized that wasn’t true. Being an introverted fundraiser is a great advantage… but you sometimes need survival tips when it comes to cocktail parties. Check out this post for some of my main tips, for example take breaks.

8 fundraising lessons I learned from Beyoncé

Guest Post: 8 Fundraising Lessons I Learned From Beyoncé

I had to include a Rory Green post in here because she’s written more guest posts for this blog than anyone, and the majority of the most popular posts of all time on this blog are Rory’s. I love this post because I love fundraising, I love Beyoncé, and I love Rory Green. She makes content so fun with gifs and snappy, effective messages. If you haven’t read this one already, do!

How to leave with #donorlove

How to Leave with #DonorLove

And lastly, this post. Beyond my love of working with the great concept of #donorlove, I felt it was really important to talk about leaving a job and how to do it gracefully, and in a way that shows love to your donors, instead of abandonment… which too often happens. The way we leave an organization should be a reflection of how we spent our time there… especially from the donors point of view. I’m very proud of this post.

So there you have it! Thanks for an awesome four years, readers! Onto the next one!

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Written by Maeve Strathy


Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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Fundraisers & This Little Piggy

Fundraisers & this little piggy

Let me start this post with a cliché: fundraisers are storytellers.

“Wow, Maeve! Tell us something we don’t know!”

You’re right. We all know the best fundraisers are storytellers. We’re embracing that. We’re all recognizing the power of stories in engaging donors in our causes and showing them the power of philanthropy.

So how come the dollars aren’t pouring in?

Well, it’s not good enough to say we’re storytellers. They have to be the right stories. And they have to be told the right way.

So what are we doing wrong?

I’ll tell you one thing: we’re acting too much like the last piggy.

“Huh?”

Yes! You heard me right!

This little piggy went to the market

This little piggy stayed home

This little piggy had roast beef

This little piggy had none

And this little piggy went WEE WEE WEE all the way home

Fundraisers are the last piggy.

The one saying WEE WEE WEE.

We are doing this. We are achieving this.

We. We. WE!

It’s not about us. It’s about them.

It’s not about we. It’s about YOU!

You being the donor.

How are we ever going to show donors the power of their philanthropy if we keep telling them about the great things WE are doing?

We have to inspire donors by telling stories about themTheir impact. What they achieve.

Want to see what I mean? Want to see the power of those kinds of stories in action?

Here’s a recent example: Prime Minister Trudeau’s victory speech on October 19th.

I was following the conversation on Twitter on this momentous occasion and my fundraising friends were all saying the same thing: Prime Minister Trudeau is so donor-centric!

Watch this clip to see what I mean.

Are you noticing it? Here’s an extra clip to bring the idea home.

It’s the most powerful word in fundraising: YOU.

Prime Minister Trudeau was telling a story; not just to his donors, but to supporters, voters, and all Canadians. The story wasn’t about his success or the party’s success; it was about what YOU made happen.

Let’s all make sure that’s the story we’re telling our donors, too.

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Written by Maeve Strathy


Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email

Guest Post: Three Resources All Fundraising Writers NEED to Know About

3 resources all fundraising writers NEED to know about

#1: Vanessa Chase – the Storytelling Non-profit

Vanessa Chase is one of my go-to resources on story telling. Her newsletter and blog are a treasure trove of tips and case studies. The section of her website dedicated to copy writing is amazing. Check it out here.

“Put your audience in the action from the start. Ideally, we want to connect with our audience as quickly as possible. This increases the likelihood that they will stay engaged with the story through to the end.” – Vanessa Chase

#2: SOFII

If you aren’t  a regular SOFII reader you should be! SOFII, the brain child of Ken Burnett, is an online collection of fundraising appeals combined with insider information on how the appeal did. It is a huge source of inspiration for me! Here are a few of my favourites:

#3. Tom Ahern

Almost everything I know about writing fundraising copy, I learned from Tom Ahern. His books are amazing, and worth a read – but he also has a fantastic section on his website of real-life appeals he has written – with his insider’s comments on what makes it great.

BONUS: Webinar: Creating a Case for Support that ignites passionate commitment(with Denny Young, Wednesday November 18th, 12:00 pm Eastern )

Are you inspiring your community to take action or treating donors and prospects like wallets? Supporters want to join the cause. They want evidence that you share their determination to make the world a better place. They want proof that your organization can realize their dreams.

Does your Case for Support make that connection, or is it just another boring plea for money?

You have a choice: make a grab for dollars or create friends for life. Which Case will you write?

In this webinar you will learn to create a Case for Support that builds loyal relationships among donors, prospective donors, volunteers, and staff.

Highlighting the well-tested research and experience of some of the world’s best Case writers, Denny will provide you with a step-by-step approach that results in committed support.

 You will learn how to:

  • Engage immediate interest by using the power of one story
  • Successfully balance logic and emotion to inform and inspire
  • Create urgency using statistics that clarify rather than confuse
  • Achieve maximum response by tailoring the call to action to audience segments

Sign up now!

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Written by Rory Green

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Rory is a Senior Development Officer by day, and FundraiserGrrl by night. As a major gifts fundraiser, she connects donors with an opportunity to invest in a better future. FundraiserGrrrl is a blog about her cheeky observations about life in fundraising.

Connect with Rory via:
Twitter

 

4 tips to find mid-level donors

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Mid-level donors continue to be a hot topic for us fundraisers. There’s always room to improve in our annual giving and major gift programs, but the generous mid-level donor has gone neglected all these years like the awkward middle children they are.

How to find mid-level donors & what to do with them

Join me in putting a stop to that!

But first we need to know: How do you find mid-level donors???

I’ll start by acknowledging how we do not find mid-level donors.

Don’t segment your donors or prospects by postal codes (or zip codes for Americans!), looking for potential in the most affluent areas in your city or country.

And don’t go looking based on who’s giving generously to other organizations.

Basically, throw away your typical prospect research toolkit!

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OK, Maeve, so we don’t use our usual tricks… what do we use???

Great question! Here’s the answer: Look right in front of you.

When I worked to develop the mid-level giving program at Wilfrid Laurier University, the first place I started looking for mid-level donors was in the existing annual donor pool.

So what are you looking for exactly? Well, there’s no right or wrong answer, but here are some good tips:

Who’s stretching?

What’s the average annual gift at your charity? Is it $100? Well then I’d look at donors who are stretching considerably beyond that. Maybe start with everyone who’s giving $500+. They could make a perfect mid-level prospect.

Who’s starting off with a biggie?

I’d also look at what donors are making as their first gift. Did someone come out of the blue and give you $250? That’s pretty generous for a first-time donor. I’d want to take a closer look at someone like that.

Who’s giving and giving and giving?

It’s not just about dollar amounts either; has someone given $100 every year for 10 years in a row? That kind of consecutive, loyal, generous and committed support should be acknowledged!

Who’s demonstrating unusual donor behaviour?

Now this is one of my favourite mid-level prospecting tips that I’ve ever heard: did one of your donors reach out to you and update their mailing address without you prompting them to?

That sounds hilarious, doesn’t it? But for any of us in fundraising, we know that rarely happens!

If you matter so much to a donor that they want to make sure you have their updated address and you didn’t have to reach out to them first? You need to pay attention to this person!

But this isn’t the only example! It’s just one idea of “unusual donor behaviour” that should cause us to pause and think.

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And that’s what finding mid-level donors is all about – paying attention! Paying attention to what’s already happening and capitalizing on it.

Now group those individuals together and you’ve got yourself a mid-level prospect pool!

How do YOU find your mid-level donors??? Share in the comments!

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Written by Maeve Strathy


Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email

Guest Post: 5 reasons we LOVE Cathy Barrick… and you should, too!

5 reasons we LOVE Cathy Barrick (a.k.a. @savinggrace)...and you should too!

Have you heard the news? Cathy Barrick, CEO of Alzheimer Society of Toronto, is coming to the #DonorLove Rendezvous. Here are five reasons why Cathy is an amazing fundraiser, and an even more amazing human being.

She puts donors front and centre.

We all know it, we all feel it. Donors are at the core of our business. But, from time to time, we let budgets and goals creep into our thoughts and determine our actions. We get wrapped up in how great our charities are, without consideration for the incredible people who make it all possible. We don’t have time to make that phone call, or write that letter. We sometimes let it go just a little too long before we thank our donors.

For Cathy, donors really are at the heart of it all. Cathy is in the business of people, first and foremost. A long-time social worker, fundraising is a natural fit for her. She seeks to understand what motivates each individual person she meets, and it’s her mission to make donors feel amazing.

Cathy’s own philosophy of #DonorLove is to express gratitude for donors thoughtfully and genuinely. Cathy lives by this mantra by finding authentic touch points, with a sprinkle of surprise and delight. She appreciates the value of each gift, from each donor, and she makes sure they know it.

She’s an amazing leader.

To achieve her vision of an organization that embraces #DonorLove, Cathy is building a thoughtful, donor-centred team from all corners of the office – so much so she has signed her entire team up for the #DonorLove Rendezvous!

Growing #DonorLove from the inside out takes time, that is true, but it is time that Cathy is willing to invest. In a sector so often plagued by bad leadership – it’s refreshing and inspiring to see Cathy’s commitment to her team.

She’s a Pisces.

Pisces are compassionate, adaptable, accepting, devoted and imaginative.

She has a super cute cat.

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Look at that face!!

She truly cares.

When Cathy isn’t working hard at her day job, she volunteers with seniors. She’s one of those kind, caring people who seem to have endless love to give. She says her role at the Alzheimer’s society is her “dream job”.

Cathy is exactly what is right about this industry. She sees ways to be better, and makes it happen by being an attentive and curious donor-lover. To her, fundraising is not about money. It’s about connecting incredible people to causes they are passionate about. It’s about solving real problems and meeting real needs. Money is just the tool.

Amen, Cathy!

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Are you someone who truly cares about donors?

Do you want to spend a day with like-minded fundraisers, having great conversations, learning and sharing?

Do you want the chance to add amazing people like Cathy to your tribe?

Well then check out the #DonorLove Rendezvous.

It’s not a conference, it’s a meeting of the minds. On Wednesday, May 11, 2016, we want you to join us in Toronto for a day of dynamic discussion, energizing conversations, inspiration, passion, and fun!

Registration is open! For a very limited time, you can register for $99. I highly encourage you to register ASAP because this is going to sell out!

Visit www.donorlove.ca now to learn more and register today!

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Written by Tayler Halonen

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Tayler is new on the fundraising scene. She discovered a love for making people feel good at a young age, and she is thrilled to grow that passion in her work as a donor-loving fundraiser. In addition to philanthropy, Tayler is enthusiastic about animals, books, food, and health.

Connect with Tayler via:
Twitter