What’s with the charity rebrand trend?!

You may have noticed a bit of a trend lately of charities “rebranding”. Canadian Diabetes Association is now Diabetes Canada. Heart & Stroke changed its logo and freshened up its visual identity in November of last year. Sick Kids launched their “VS” campaign last year, too. Big charities are bringing new attention to themselves and the important work they do by making a creative splash in the marketplace.

Why? Well, if you’ve been working in fundraising for the last 10 years or longer, you’ve noticed how saturated the Canadian (or any, really) marketplace has become with charities and their messages to Canadians to GIVE! It’s a competitive landscape these days, and in order to stay relevant and reach new audiences and inspire new donors, sometimes a new way to express your “brand” is the way to cut through the noise.

But don’t just jump on the rebranding bandwagon! A new brand or campaign is usually the tip of the iceberg. It’s a big investment for any charity – large or small – to make a big change to its look and name, so you have to give it some serious thought.

Here’s a few things to think about:

Does your brand need a facelift? Heart & Stroke was concerned it was perceived as “your grandmother’s charity” and that it was old-fashioned and not relevant for younger generations. Part of its motivation to rebrand was to modernize its look to reach new audiences. If you’re successfully connecting with donors of all ages, a rebrand may not be for you.

Does your cause need new attention? Diabetes Canada rebranded as much to end the stigma around diabetes as it did to freshen up its look. You may want to rebrand to position the important work you do in a new way, but if you’re feeling good about the way your brand aligns with you’re mission, it may not be the right move.

If you’re trying to reach new audiences, who are they? I did a few interviews on the radio the other day on the topic of charity rebrands, and a lot of the interviewers thought charities were motivated to rebrand in order to get millennials involved in their causes. Fortunately none of them could see me roll my eyes. Remember: millennials are a nut to crack when it comes to fundraising and philanthropy, but they are probably NOT your target audience. It will be a decade at least before millennials make up a meaningful percentage of your donor base, so don’t change your look for them. Think about who you really want to inspire, and make sure any changes you make will speak to them.

What will your donors think? I think that most donors want to see your work funded, and if you can inspire new donors to give more through a rebrand, then your donors may fully support it. But if you run the risk of abandoning your donor base by trying to unnecessarily change your brand, forget it! Don’t let the excitement of a new logo cloud your judgment when it comes to keeping your best supporters close!

So don’t rush into the trend! Make sure you spend time thinking about whether rebranding is right for you. It could be the difference. Just know for sure before you take the plunge!

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for ten years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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Guest Post: Psychology Secrets Every Fundraiser Should Know

Secret #1: The Eyes Have It!

Have you ever noticed how the eyes on a cereal box follow you down the aisle? It’s not an accident! Research by Cornell university has shown that we are more likely to buy cereals that make eye contact with us. The eye contact improves sales!

The lesson for fundraisers? Make sure the photos on your direct mail, emails, newsletter and annual reports are making eye contact with the reader! No artistic shots of people gazing into the distance.

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Lesson #2: Scarcity Motivates!

When human beings perceive that a resource is limited – they want it more. Psychologists call this the scarcity principle. When people are able to anticipate the regret of not taking advantage of a limited time offer, they are more likely to act.

The lesson for fundraisers: put deadlines special offers – a special window of time for matching gifts, or the approaching end of the year can be powerful factors to motivate a donor.

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Lesson #3: The Consistency Principle

Simply put, people like to act and behave in a way that is consistent with how they have acted and behaved in the past. A Princeton study found that asking people if they hypothetically would be willing to volunteer before asking them to volunteer dramatically increased the number of people willing to volunteer.

The lesson for fundraisers: Every year at Christmas the SPCA sends me an ornament to hang on my Christmas tree that says I support the SPCA – right before their year-end pack. It’s no coincidence! Prime your donors with ways they can show their support for your cause: signing a petition, sharing something on social media, a bumper sticker for their car. Referencing a donor’s past giving, or that they are a monthly donor are other ways to take advantage of the consistency principle. Establish that supporting your organization is something they consistently do.

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Want more psychology secrets to help you raise more money? Join Leah Eustace and Scott Fortnum as they take you inside the mind of the donor in their June 17th webinar: “The Psychology of Giving – What makes donors tick & WHY they give!”

What if you could spend a couple of hours inside your donor’s head?

What if you knew how she thinks and what she thinks?

Would you become a different fundraiser?

You know you would. 

Get inside a donor’s brain and discover neuroscience secrets to raise more money.

For only $24.99 you can sign up for this webinar:

  • Find out how emotion overrules reason.
  • Learn how impulses are created.
  • Discover how lightning-fast thoughts and images can drive decisions.

You’ll come away with new tools and a new donor understanding.

You’ll never, ever see your donors the same way again.

Seats are limited – sign up now!

Can’t make it on the 17th? Don’t worry – we will record the webinar and send it to you to watch as many times as you like! Sign up to save yourself a spot.

Leah Eustace, ACFRE, is Chief Idea Goddess at Good Works. Scott Fortnum, ACFRE, is the Executive Director, The Living City Foundation. They are both international sought after speakers, thinkers and #DonorLove experts.

Our last webinar sold out! Don’t miss your chance to get inside your donor’s brain!
SIGN UP NOW!

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Written by Rory Green

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Rory is a Senior Development Officer by day, and FundraiserGrrl by night. As a major gifts fundraiser, she connects donors with an opportunity to invest in a better future. FundraiserGrrrl is a blog about her cheeky observations about life in fundraising.

Connect with Rory via:
Twitter

 

 

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**SPONSORED POST** Email maeve@whatgivesphilanthropy.com for more information about advertising on www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com.

#whatgiveswednesday | young (non)donors week ten | let’s take a brief look back, shall we?

Wow! Can you believe we’re already on Week 10 of #whatgiveswednesday? Time is flying!

I thought this milestone was a good opportunity to look back at weeks 1 through 9 and ask, “What have we learned so far?”

I re-read the first 9 posts and already some clear themes are coming through. Here they are:

ONE: TRANSPARENCY
I’ll talk more about communicating with young donors in a sec, but transparency on its own was one of the most important factors I identified after re-reading the posts. Charities must be transparent when communicating with (young) donors. Make your impact known, allow donors to see stats and metrics on their impact, and let them know without a doubt that you did exactly what you said you would with their money.

TWO: INVOLVE
As Sheena Greer told us in her awesome #whatgiveswednesday guest blog post, “We are going to give our time first and our money second.” You’ll show young donors just how transparent and trustworthy you are when they get involved and have a “behind the scenes” look at who you are and what you do. Make it fun and social for them, and the money will follow.

THREE: RESTRICTED
The trend is that all donors – young and old – are moving away from unrestricted giving. It goes hand-in-hand with the changing approach to philanthropy; it isn’t guilt or obligation-driven anymore, so there isn’t a willingness to just pour funds into a general fund and impact… who knows what? Make your giving opportunities more exciting, specific, and cause-driven.

FOUR: MAKE GIVING EASY
If you’re investing in your young donor program, you better have an easy online giving form that’s also mobile friendly. End of story.

FIVE: COMMUNICATE
In addition to being transparent, there are other important factors in your communication with young donors: be clear, be concise, tell stories, use images, integrate short videos, include user-generated content, and be authentic. Don’t use an institutional voice; get existing young donors – a.k.a. “gen y besties” – to tell their stories for you, just like Carolyn Hawthorn suggested in her #whatgiveswednesday guest blog post.

It’s not that complicated, but there’s still more mystery to be solved! Tune in on Wednesday, April 15 for our next segment. Thanks for reading!

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in educational fundraising for the past eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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#whatgiveswednesday | young (non)donors week nine | guest post: boom! what? harness the millennials!

I recently attended a conference in Seattle, WA (Academic Impressions Young Alumni: Establishing Lifelong Relationships) and was inspired to “guest blog” about my trip.

Full disclosure: When I was in high school, the Macarena was the biggest dance craze. As such, I am fully aware I can never be part of the Millennial movement (although I’ve seen some great mashup-revivals of those moves recently…)

However, just as I can appreciate great feminist literature or how Bill James could influence major league baseball without ever playing pro ball, I’ve been turning my professional attention to this next great generation: The Millennials (aka Gen Y) despite not being “one of them.” I’ll try not to focus on the myth that they don’t give (and get off my lawn, you meddling kids!) because it’s simply not true (87% of millennial employees donated to a nonprofit in 2013) but rather how our collective mindset and paradigms need to change to allow this group of highly creative, socially motivated folks to connect their money with their passions.

First, this is the #ShowMe generation. Having instant access to information (accurate or not) has trained them to expect to see the impact of their gifts immediately and in a way that aligns with their passion or sense of self. Thank you Facebook and Google Analytics! Make sure your donor relations strategy allows your students and younger alumni to access stats and metrics on the direct impact of their gifts. Also, tie their support to tangible projects that will impact their donor experience. Disinterest in donating to general funds is also trending.

Second, this group has been connected via the internet most of their lives. They know how to navigate web and mobile devices and have no patience for multiple click thrus or ugly websites. Is your content accessible and mobile friendly? 83% of Millennials currently use a SmartPhone and in 2014, mobile access surpassed desktop access. Invest in your marketing and communications online strategies for this group and be intentional.

Third, remember when commercials used to be 30 seconds and YouTube videos were 5 minutes long? Now, we see 6 second Vines, video viewing rates dropping off after 48 seconds, and if it doesn’t fit in 140 characters, it’s not worth saying. Be clear, be concise, and be honest. Every generation has its own vernacular, be sure to use images and short videos for millennials. User-generated content is great and sometimes preferable to “institution-produced” adverts. When Arthur Brisbane said, “a picture is worth a thousand words” I’m not sure he was ready for Instagram, where 8 million pictures and videos are posted every hour. Every HOUR!

And finally, keep in mind that Gen X and Millennials are set to inherit $40 trillion (with a “T”!) in the next 50 years. Can you afford not to speak their language?  

The better we all do as an industry to change our stewardship and donor relations strategies, the more connected, engaged, and INVESTED this key demographic will be. Boom! What? Harness the Millennials!

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Written by Ben Seewald

unnamedGrowing up, Ben Seewald wasn’t like every other kid, who dreamed about being a doctor, or a kangaroo, or an astronaut – he always wanted to work with phenomenal people in Alumni Relations at a University. Ben is living his dream at Queen’s University as an Alumni Officer, working on student and recent graduate engagement programming.

Connect with Ben via:
LinkedIn

Competition

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I’m not a big fan of Monopoly or Scrabble. The thing is, I’m not an inherently competitive person. That’s part of the reason I like educational fundraising and alumni relations: they’re not inherently competitive either! My counterparts at other schools and I are always sharing resources and ideas because our “customers” aren’t the same. We don’t share alumni, so there’s no competition, right?

WRONG! I realize now that not feeling the inherent competition in fundraising – educational or otherwise – is not advisable.

Paul Nazareth is a big proponent of reading business books. I recently read Little Bets by Peter Sims and The Opening Playbook by Andrew Dietz, both recommended by Paul. I had to sift through some of the more “businessy” stuff to find what’s relevant for me, but what I found is that the concepts are much more relevant to fundraising than I would’ve expected.

Here’s the thing: we all know that donors are now choosing to support fewer charities. They believe larger donations to fewer organizations make a bigger impact, and they’re not wrong. So how do we make their list? We have to compete.

So let’s ask ourselves: what do we do better than any other charity? Are we better at articulating how we meet needs? Do we provide the best information to donors on the impact their giving makes? Are our communications more eye-catching? Do we make our donors feel better than other charities do?

Think about it! Your competition is.

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Written by Maeve Strathy


Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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The 5 Most Interesting Things I Learned on Day 1 of #AGCongress14

 

the 5 most interesting things I learned on day 1 of #AGCongress14

Ideally I would save this blog post for next week, but my sanity relies on routine, so I’ll stick with my regularly scheduled “every other Friday at 10:00 a.m.”.

What’s today’s post about? Well, right at this very moment I am in a session called “Picasso & Edison: Learn how to be both an artist and scientist in today’s fundraising world”, led by Samantha Laprade, CFRE (a.k.a. @GryphonReport). No, I am not blogging in front of her rather than paying attention to her session! I am writing this post from the comfort of my hotel room in Toronto on Thursday at 5:00 pm. I have just attended Day 1 of the 2014 Canadian Higher Education Annual Giving Congress in Toronto a.k.a. #AGCongress14. Yes, it’s me and dozens of other Annual Giving nerds talking about what we do and how we can be excellent at it. I’m in heaven!

So on that note, today’s post is the five most interesting things I learned yesterday on Day 1 of Congress. Here goes…

  1. STOP! Be stupidly creative. The very inspiring Joel Faflak of Western University started the day off by telling us to stop doing what you’re doing and do something mindlessly creative. Draw, see a musical, do something! Our creativity is being threatened by the business of our every day work, but we can’t stop cultivating it.
  2. Don’t solicit young alumni with the traditional academic segmentation. My friend Ryan Brejak of the University of Guelph (and a guest blogger for this site) delivered a great session on young alumni giving and stressed that millennials need to be segmented differently rather than by their faculty. Segment them by the non-academic affinities they have.
  3. Why would they care? I attended a panel about “How to Write for Development” and asked them what’s more important in a fundraising letter, to emphasize need or success. Chuck Chan of University of Toronto replied that it’s most important to focus on why the reader would care about this. Would they care about a dilapidated building, or would they care about what’s going to happen in a new one?
  4. There are three types of donors. I attended my mentor Paul Nazareth‘s session about planned giving and he outlined three types of donors: (1) the DNA donor, where giving is in their DNA, and so is your organization; (2) the academic, who values your institution because of how they turned what they learned into success; (3) and the trouble makers and weirdos who had a great time at your institution who will give back because of their experiences.
  5. Everyone should be an annual fund prospect all the time. The last session of the day was led by two fundraising powerhouses: Lorna SomersBob Burdenski. They talked about the worlds of major giving and annual giving colliding, and Lorna stressed that major gift prospects/donors should never be taken out of annual solicitations. They should always receive the calls, direct mailings, etc. and major gifts should “opt out” of this if really necessary, whereas the default will be that they’re solicited annually.

What a great day Day 1 was. I bet I’m already energized by Day 2 and it’s only 10:00 a.m.

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in educational fundraising for the past seven years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email

5 Things I’ve Learned about Fundraising at Trinity College School

Today is bittersweet.  It’s my last day in my office at Trinity College School where I’ve served as Alumni Development Officer for 3.5 years.  The sweet part is departing TCS for an exciting new position at my alma mater Wilfrid Laurier University, but it is always difficult leaving an incredible work experience like TCS has been for me.

So, in honour of Trinity College School, its alumni, and all of my outstanding colleagues that I’ve had the pleasure to work with and learn from, I wanted to share with my readers what I’ve learned about fundraising at TCS (I’ve boiled it down to five things, but there are actually hundreds).

What I’ve Learned about Fundraising at Trinity College School

Young People Will Give
You know my feelings on young alumni by now – you must ask them to support your school.  Why do I feel so passionately about that?  Because at TCS I’ve learned that they will give.

Yes, they’re different.  They won’t just give because it’s a habit or because it’s expected of them.  They’re skeptical; they want to see how you provide value, to them or to your community.  They want to know what the impact of their gift will be, and they want to be told that their $25 will make a difference.

So what?  They have different needs than other donors.  So meet those needs, and ask. Because they will give.

Major Gifts Take Time
I’ve been fortunate enough to have a small taste of major gift fundraising while at TCS, which is an area of fundraising that I’m really keen to pursue further.  My first exposure to major gift solicitations was simply observing, listening to, and learning from my Executive Director.  What did I learn?  That these gifts take time and that you must be persistent.  It’s not just wining, dining, and schmoozing.  It’s not just having the confidence and courage to sit across from someone and ask them for $1 million.  It’s identifying, cultivating, researching, planning, strategizing, and then asking… and then waiting… following up, asking again… trying from a different angle, and then waiting again… and then following up again, and then – maybe – there’s a “yes”.

This has been a great lesson to learn, because it’s not really the attitude I went into fundraising with.  I imagined it being difficult, but not because of the time it takes.  This takes special skills that not everyone has, and if I’m to continue in the direction of major gift fundraising, I’m grateful that I learned from the best, and I intend to cultivate and sharpen those skills in myself.

Mobile Giving is Tricky
Mobile giving a.k.a. text-to-give or text-to-pledge continues to be a hot topic among fundraisers.  I had the opportunity to implement a mobile giving program while working at TCS.  Our program uses the text-to-pledge method, whereby a donor can text us with their name and the amount of their donation.  We receive an email with their name, donation amount, and phone number, and then we can follow up by phone to confirm and process the donation.

The nice thing about this process is that, unlike other programs, no percentage of the donation goes to the service provider and we receive the name of the person making the donation.  Normally with mobile giving programs, all you would get is the money, minus the portion that goes to the service provider.  That’s why mobile giving works so well for disaster relief.  An organization raising money to aid, for example, people after the earthquake in Haiti just needs money!  It doesn’t matter who’s giving it, it just matters that the money is coming in, and that it’s coming in fast.  That’s another key element to make mobile giving work: urgency.  When people sense urgency and a genuine need for money, they’ll respond quickly, and move on with their day.

So mobile giving is great for unique, urgent situations, but will it become an alternative to sending your cheque in the mail?  My feeling is no.  I don’t think mobile giving is another way of giving as part of a regular Annual Fund.  Giving online via your smart phone is one thing, but people still want a connection when they’re making a donation for the most part, so we still want to keep it as personal as possible.  My verdict is that mobile giving does not work for the average organization.

Customized Fundraising is the Key
What is the future of fundraising???  Customization/Personalization.  This is not a new insight, to be sure.  People are always more likely to respond to something if they feel it is written to them.  When you get a mass email, you feel no remorse in deleting it, but if you feel something has been sent specifically and thoughtfully to you, you may pause and give it more attention.

Fundraisers everywhere are getting really excited about new trends like crowdfunding and mobile giving, and there is certainly some great new technology out there that we can capitalize on, but I think our best bet as fundraisers is using new technologies to complement our existing programs, and take advantages of the ways that technology can assist in a customized and personalized giving experience.

I’m sure you want an example, so here it is: one of the coolest projects I worked on while at TCS was an animated video that we made with an incredible company called Switch Video.  The video was intended for all of our alumni and parents, to educate them on two capital projects that are the top priorities of the school’s current capital campaign.  There was hope that we would encourage more gifts to the campaign, but the main focus was building awareness of the projects.  The video was cool simply because it was animated; a totally different approach from a 150 year-old school that uses traditional marketing for the most part.

That said, the video’s “coolness” went far beyond animation.  The video was also customized for 5,500 unique recipients.  These recipients would receive a unique email with their name in the subject line, their name in the body of the email, and a unique URL to view the video.  Then the video was also customized to include their name (and grad year, if applicable) in different parts of the animation.  For example, when called to make a contribution to the campaign, an envelope popped up on the screen with the TCS logo in the return address spot, and the alumnus’ or parent’s name in the centre.  Pretty cool, eh?  Think of it as a mail merge, but for video.

This is the future of fundraising.  We need to focus on using new technologies to assist us in the age-old effective tool when it comes to fundraising: personalization.  When we’re looking for a big gift, we wouldn’t send a general letter to someone, would we?  We’d meet them in person.  So let’s take that idea and apply it elsewhere!  I’m glad TCS reinforced this idea for me through this amazing project (and many others).

Alumni Engagement is a Beautiful Thing
Finally – alumni engagement.  I don’t know where else I’ll work in my career, but in many ways it’s hard to imagine an alumni community more engaged than the alumni I’ve met at Trinity College School.  Perhaps it’s the significant tuition they pay that makes them feel more invested in the life of the school.  Perhaps it’s the formative years they attend TCS during (ages 15-18, in particular).  Perhaps it’s the extremely small community they’re a part of, and that the intimate size is easier to stay engaged with.

Whatever it is, it made working at TCS a total pleasure.  There’s a big event that I organize annually; it’s a shinny (hockey) tournament for alumni, parents, and friends of the school.  Coincidentally, it takes place tomorrow, and will mark my last day of work at the school.  Unfortunately, the event was created to honour the memory of an alumnus of the school who was tragically killed while cycling across Canada.  But, the goodwill it creates in the community, and the positive way it honours the memory of this alumnus, is a beautiful thing.  With many events, we have to work really hard to get good attendance.  With this tournament, I sit back and watch the registrations roll in.  People are delighted to drive up to the school for a day of hockey and a dinner at the end of the day.  It involves a lot of organization, but not a lot of “work”.  It’s a pleasure to be involved with.

There’s also the Alumni Association, a small volunteer group made up of a variety of alumni from different grad years.  I’ve gotten quite close to a lot of the members of this group, and seeing their genuine interest in and love for the school makes my work so meaningful.  They want to provide value for their fellow alumni, organize events that provide new ways to engage the disengaged, connect alumni together and celebrate the thing they have in common: that they attended Trinity College School.  It’s hard not to get excited about their passion.  It’s what makes the work I do so… fun!!!

The alumni engagement at TCS is something I will always take with me, and will positively inform the communities I work with in the future.  I’m forever grateful.

 

And with that, I sign off as the TCS Alumni Development Officer!  www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com will continue strong, always with the memory of TCS, but with new experiences and projects, too!

Thank you, TCS!

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in educational fundraising for the past seven years.  Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | Email

Guest Post: How Fundraising has Changed in the Last 10 Years

One part of What Gives Philanthropy‘s mission statement says that the blog “intends to discuss and explore… topics from all angles and points of view, inviting guest bloggers to write and share their ideas”.  My hope has always been that people from all over the industry and all over the world will contribute to this blog, and today’s guest blogger Alison Richmond has helped me get the ball rolling on that.  Here is something relevant to our peers in the United Kingdom and in Europe as a whole.  Thanks, Alison!

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An economic recession or a financial crisis is usually tagged with the ability to decimate charitable collections from philanthropic organisations and individuals. However, as per an article published in the Third Sector UK, most of the charities within the European Union, close to 75 percent, have been able to increase or maintain their voluntary streams of income even during the ongoing Eurozone crisis.

Economic changes in the international markets impact every aspect of financial transactions, business-related, or otherwise. Similarly, fundraising has also evolved considerably over the last decade or so, especially with the dramatic changes in the global market scene, technological advancement and other global changes. In the paragraphs that follow, let us take a quick look at some of the recent trends in the fundraising system in Europe:


Going Beyond Borders

Fundraising is an important way of keeping a crisis situation under check, be it a local disaster or even a global problem. The last decade has witnessed some terrifying tsunamis, hurricanes and other natural and man-made catastrophes. While state-run disaster-management squads have a big role to play in relief, fundraising is an extremely important mode of giving aid and providing relief during a tragedy. One important trend that the fundraising system in Europe has witnessed over the last decade or so is the tendency of cross-border giving. Charitable donations are mobilised beyond their local area to more large-scale and international issues.
The Impact of Social Media and Technology

No one can deny the role of information technology and how it has transformed through leaps and bounds, especially over the last decade. Mobile phones are ubiquitous and almost everyone is on social networking media. The importance of such technological platforms is that they have become a fundamental part of communication. They have become so integral to everyday life that they have consequently also become excellent modes of campaigning and raising funds for specific causes. They have a great deal of international exposure, and are a guaranteed way of spreading the message far and wide. Websites, blogs, email forwards, social networking, news channels and so on are fantastic platforms for fundraising campaigns.
Entry of Private-Owned Firms into the World of Fundraising

Fundraising has taken on a corporate outlook, with the entry of several private corporations into the world of fundraising. One of the outcomes of this foray is that fundraising has become more professionalised and more efficient. The access to technology is one step that has been enhanced. In addition, fundraising itself gains more legitimacy when it is backed by a corporate tag, since more people see the validation in an agency that is collecting funds, rather than in small organisations or individuals doing the same.
Online Transactions

Online transactions are not just limited to credit card payments anymore. Fundraising has gone online and internet-based charitable contributions is one of the most significant channels through which donations and voluntary contributions are made today. These methods are not just instant and effective, but they are also hassle-free.

 

Written by Alison Richmond

alisonrichmondAlison has worked in the fundraising industry for several years and enjoys helping to develop different fundraising methods for schools.  It’s important that fundraisers don’t lose hope during these difficult economic times and strive for innovation!  She currently works for easyfundraising.  You can contact Alison at a.richmond@easyfundraising.org.uk.