6 things I’ve learned in my new job

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This is a pretty personal post.

All my posts come from personal experience and opinions, but this one isn’t like that.

This isn’t about fundraising or philanthropy.

This is about my new job. 

Have you started a new job recently? Are you thinking of starting one? It’s not for the faint of heart, is it?

If you read my post on direct response best practices, or you follow me on Twitter, then you know I love my new gig! But that doesn’t mean it hasn’t been challenging.

We’ve all been where I am: somewhere between loving life and feeling way out of your comfort zone. The important thing is to tune into the lessons you’re learning along the way. And in case they might be helpful to you, I thought it was worth sharing my lessons.

#1 — Show up every day, smiling & ready to work

This simple thing cannot be understated. It’s great advice that I received from my old boss when I started my current job. I was feeling a little insecure in my second week and she said, “Every day you show up smiling and ready to work, the people who hired you are seeing the return on their investment.” You can’t know everything right away, but you can show everyone that you’re trying.

#2 — Get comfortable being uncomfortable

This was – and is – my biggest challenge. I’m the type of person who wants to be the best! I don’t care how that sounds, it’s just the truth. But when you start a job, you’re not the best. You’re new. Embrace it. Because when you do, you can physically feel learning and growth happen. If you fight it, it’ll take you longer to get where you want to be.

#3 — Be flexible

Something that will help you do that is to be flexible. Don’t expect to know everything right away and be flexible in the ways you get there. For example, even the ways in which you organize yourself! My new job requires organization like I’ve never experienced before and I’ve already tried my hand at 3+ methods in my first three months. Each tweak makes things a bit better. I don’t know if I’ve gotten there yet, but I try to adapt and modify and be flexible, and it seems to help.

#4 — Mentally prepare & protect yourself

This one is crucial. I read this awesome series called My Morning Routine and one person they interviewed recently (I wish I could share an exact quote, but I can’t find it!) talked about how we push too many things to the evening. We sleep, we work, and then – if we have time – we do something for ourselves in the evening. This person’s routine was all about mentally preparing and protecting herself in the morning for the stress of the day. I love that, and that’s something I’ve tried to incorporate into my life with this new job. I get up early, I work out as many mornings during the week as I can handle, I always take at least 30 minutes for coffee and a healthy breakfast (usually an hour), and I leave to work early enough that I avoid traffic and arrive before most of my colleagues so I can gather myself together before all the work begins. It’s a way of preparing a shield against the craziness to come, and it works!

#5 — Don’t spread yourself too thin

If your new job is accompanied by a move to a new city like mine was, you might be tempted to get involved with new things or struggle to keep up old things (I’m talking volunteering, board membership, that sort of thing). Be careful here. I think we’ve all got to have something outside of work to be involved with, but I’ve been trying to streamline my “extracurriculars” since I’m committed to work and don’t want to get overwhelmed. I unfortunately had to drop one thing I’m involved with, and I’ve had to say no to a few others, but I’m also keeping up a few that I’m currently involved with, too! I don’t want life to be only work, but I also don’t want there to be too much on my plate right now.

#6 — SPEAK UP!

All of this is stuff YOU can do, but sometimes you might need something from your new employer, and that’s okay, too. Are you feeling like you were onboarded well? Did you get good training and orientation? No? Well don’t sit around feeling overwhelmed; tell someone! Be honest about what you need, what you’re missing, etc. Everyone’s busy so getting a new hire doesn’t mean the work stops, but they do owe it to you to bring you up to speed. It’s nice if you don’t have to ask them, but if you need to, DO! Your success is up to you!

Good luck!

P.S. I’m launching an e-book on Mid-Level Giving! Want to be the first to get it? Sign up for my newsletter! Click here to sign up!

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Written by Maeve Strathy


Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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Guest Post: 8 tips to fire up your job search

8 tips to FIRE UP your job search!

 

So, you’re looking for a job? You are not alone, my friend. Whether you are thinking about making the transition into the world of fundraising or moving to a new city to be with the one you love, here are some tried and tested tips – by yours truly:

  1. Start with some soul-searching. Where do you see yourself in five years? What kind of fundraising job are you looking for? What are you passionate about? Know your strengths and let them guide you through the job hunting process.
  2. Check out your local job search sites. Here are a couple of my favourites: Charity Village, Indeed, and Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP). For AFP, stay connected with your local chapter. I’m in the KW area, so I keep my eye on the Golden Horseshoe chapter. Also, make a list of your top employers and keep checking their websites – you never know when that PERFECT job will be posted.
  3. Inspire yourself with motivational quotes. Each morning I would wake up and post them on my Facebook, as well as print them out and sprinkle them around the house. Don’t underestimate the power of positive thinking.

    Inspiration Board

  4. Network, network, NETWORK! My first week in Kitchener I attended an AFP networking mixer. Best. Decision. Ever! Everyone was super-friendly and very approachable, as you will soon see for yourself in the biz. “Your mission, should you choose to accept it” (too much cheese?) is to push yourself out of your comfort zone and make at least one new meaningful connection at each event. The fundraising world is a very small community, and you never know who can open a door for you in the future.
  5. Learn something new everyday. Read blogs, participate in webinars, attend meet-ups and conferences. I have been participating with the #DonorLove series since its inception, and that’s actually how I met Maeve! There are so many great resources out there to help grow your skills. They are also a great networking opportunity. Here are some other ones you may be interested in that I have/will be attending: The #DonorLove Rendezvous, AFP Fundamentals of Fundraising, and the Canadian Higher Education Annual Giving Congress.
  6. Interview preparation is key! You’ve landed an interview – YAY! Now it’s time to become an expert on the organization you’re interviewing with. If this is one of your dream employers from the list you’ve made (see #2), you’ve probably already spent countless hours reviewing their website and learning everything there is to know about them. One great piece of advice that I received from a friend was to make an online donation to the charity, and then talk about the experience and process in the interview. Thanks, Josh Bowman for this idea!).
  7. Asking for help is not a sign of weakness nor suggests that you are incompetent. It shows that you are taking the process seriously and that you are committed to putting your best foot forward. Ask a friend to help role play some potential interview questions. Ask your mentor(s) to review and provide feedback on your cover letter and resume. Speak to an employment service agent. I found all of these very helpful.
  8. Follow up! After your interview, send a thank you card to everyone involved to make a lasting impression. The ‘gold standard’ applies here, too, so be sure these are sent out within 24 hours. Also, a great question to ask at the end of the interview is their approximate timelines, and don’t be shy to touch base with them around that date.

While it may seem overwhelming at first, I promise you, with a little hard work and determination, it will all work out in the end.

Oh, and one more thing – remember to be yourself and enjoy the process.

Cheers!

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Written by Andrew Geekie

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Andrew is a Development Coordinator with the Alzheimer Society Waterloo Wellington.

Connect with Andrew via:
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5 things I learned at Laurier

5 things I learned at Laurier

As some of you may know, I’m starting a new career adventure, and on July 24th I worked my last day at Wilfrid Laurier University. Like when I left my job before Laurier, it was bittersweet saying goodbye to such a great work experience. And, also like when I finished my last job, I think it’s important to reflect on some of the lessons I learned in my time at Laurier, so here we go!

Mid-Level Giving has OODLES of potential
I hope you know by now that my focus while at Laurier was on mid-level giving, which we called Leadership Giving. The program had been in its infancy when I started, and I had the opportunity to further build and formalize the program. I was so lucky to have that opportunity! Mid-level giving is this funny area of fundraising that hasn’t been fully established yet. At Laurier, I was part of the Annual Giving team, which I think made a lot of sense, but I also had a lot in common with the major gifts team, so I was like the awkward middle child, not totally sure of where I fit in. But, over time the program made more and more sense to me, and became a really happy hybrid of both annual and major giving at the university. And it has so much potential! Not only in filling the pipeline between annual and major gifts, but in giving generous mid-level donors the best donor experience they can possibly get. That only ever does good things for fundraising!

Booking meetings is the hardest part
One of the more major giving-y components of the mid-level giving program at Laurier was face-to-face meetings with donors, which I loved (see: “I LOVE DONORS!”), and which also had – unsurprisingly – the highest ROI (pardon the corporate speak) for the program. That said, booking meetings is hard! I thought the meeting itself would be the hard part, but it’s not; it’s getting the meeting in the first place! I definitely learned some tips and tricks along the way (future blog post for sure!), but that was a big lesson for me.

I love analysis!
I love how a job can teach you what you don’t want to do and also what you LOVE doing! Laurier taught me that I love analyzing programs. When asked what I was most excited about with my program when I started, I said “completing a full fiscal year” so that I could actually look at the program and see what was working and what wasn’t. Once I finished that first full fiscal year, I absolutely loved the process of poring over the data and figuring out what it meant, and how the program should operate moving forward based on that. I think in my new job, I’m going to be able to enjoy that kind of work a lot!

The people make the experience
We all have our good days and bad days at work, but what tends to matter most is who we work with and who we can celebrate the good days – and talk through the bad days – with. I worked with INCREDIBLE people at Laurier; from colleagues who became lifelong friends to mentors who I idolized (and sometimes both at the same time). That’s one of the most bitter parts about leaving: not seeing those incredible people everyday. Fortunately I plan to keep them close in my network, and I’ll never forget what I learned from them.

I LOVE DONORS!
Finally: the donors. Oh, the donors! I sent many of them goodbye notes in my last week, but they were really love notes. Aside from the great people I worked with, the donors are the ones I’ll miss most. They were so inspiring, so kind, so generous, and all so amazing to talk to. Some made me cry, some made me laugh, and all of them made my day! I remember leaving a donor meeting, bounding up the stairs to my office, and one of my good friends Sharline exclaimed, “You look so happy! Where’d you come from?” And I proudly said, “A meeting with a donor!”. As fundraisers, working with donors is something we’re so fortunate to do, and my work at Laurier made that clear to me in a major way.

So that’s it! On to the next adventure! Thank you, Laurier!

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Written by Maeve Strathy


Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising for over eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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Guest Post: The Efficient “Chief Everything Officer”

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Are you the “Chief Everything Officer” at your nonprofit? Are you in charge of fundraising, communications, event planning, grant writing and public relations?  I feel your pain! Once upon a time, so was I.

What can you do to keep yourself from burning out and share the work?

Here’s what worked for me:

  1. Recruit a small army of volunteers – You might already have a volunteer who is passionate about your organization’s work who would gladly help you proofread copy, stuff envelopes, make phone calls, or do a number of tasks to lessen your load. Delegate whatever you can!
  2. Involve your board members – if you have board members that are retired professionals, often they are happy to help with anything, you just have to ask!
  3. Get organized – prioritize tasks weekly, or even daily.  Block out chunks of uninterrupted time to accomplish the top items, then move down the list.  Haven’t called your top donor once since the last gift two months ago? Set aside every Friday morning to make donor phone calls for one hour.  Take that list of your top 20 donors and keep it by your phone!

It CAN be done!

Wishing you abundance and success!

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Written by Ayda Sanver, MBA, CFRE

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Ayda runs Ayda Sanver Consulting, LLC, and she is also the author of “Tag, You’re IT – Now Raise Us Some Money”.

Connect with Ayda via:
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#whatgiveswednesday | goodbye!

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Author Peter Sims found that Steve Jobs, Chris Rock, Frank Gehry, and many other successful people have an approach to their work in common: they all have achieved remarkable results by methodically taking small, experimental steps.

“Rather than believing they have to start with a big idea or plan a whole project out in advance… they make a methodical series of little bets about what might be a good direction, learning critical information from lots of little failures and from small but significant wins that allow them to find unexpected avenues and arrive at extraordinary outcomes.”

That’s what #whatgiveswednesday was: my little bet. Encouraged by Paul Nazareth, I wanted to explore what my niche in the fundraising world might be. I had some experience with young alumni at my last job, and have passionate opinions about the great potential of millennial giving, and so I embarked on a year-long journey to explore this area of fundraising – along with awesome guest bloggers – to see if we could crack the mystery.

Well, we learned a lot! But it’s time to say goodbye to #whatgiveswednesday.

Why? In short, it doesn’t feel right anymore. I don’t feel that millennial giving is my niche, I’ve been struggling to find more to write about, and I’ve been having a lot more fun thinking and writing about other things. I focus on mid-level giving in my 9-5 job and have started to write about that more, I’ve been exploring the concept of #DonorLove and that has been inspiring me! #whatgiveswednesday and thinking about millennial giving have felt more like chores lately, and I’ve got enough chores to dread. My blog should never be one!

Plus, there’s awesome people like Erin O’Neill and Ryan Brejak exploring this area, so I’ll leave the experts to it, and take my focus elsewhere!

So – I’ll still be posting on Wednesdays, but I’m removing the theme and just adding more great content on philanthropy and fundraising.

In fact, I’m going to post every Wednesday!!! I’m sick of posting every other Friday, because Fridays are a horrible day for blogging. So, starting now, tune into www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com every Wednesday for awesome new content!

Thanks for being part of my little bet!

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Written by Maeve Strathy


Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in educational fundraising for the past eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email

Guest Post: 11 things I learned about fundraising/philanthropy when I fell into the field temporarily

11 things I learned about fundraising-philanthropy when I fell into the field temporarily

  1. There are people who actually enjoy asking others for money

  1. Fundraisers WANT to help people help others

  1. There is an art form to fundraising

  1. Prospect researchers remember EVERYTHING about donors

  1. Apparently, the most successful solicitations are long, story-based letters sent in the mail… who knew?

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  1. Non-profits are desperately trying to figure out young donors

  1. Every donor communication needs to have an ask

  1. Scholarships, research, etc.… all the great work non-profits do for communities doesn’t just happen out of thin air. There are teams of people working hard everyday to help people achieve their goals

  1. There are major debates about seemingly minor word choices in solicitations

  1. Who needs Christmas when December 31 is the best fundraising day of all year!

  1. Fundraisers really really like what they do!

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Written by Kimberly Elworthy

VR6X0087_1Kimberly is a communications specialist, and recently worked in fundraising and alumni relations for 18 months. She is currently on the Board of Directors for the Grand River Film Festival. (Click here for more).

Connect with Kimberly via:
Twitter | LinkedIn

100th Post — What Gives???

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Happy 100th Post, What Gives!!!

This was a milestone I nearly overlooked, but I didn’t, and this special 100th post is about why I didn’t overlook that milestone.

I recently took a “staycation“, and something I set aside time to do on my staycation was a What Gives Retreat. Thanks to some conversations I’ve had with Rory Green lately, combined with a guest lecture I did on blogging to University of Waterloo students, I realized how important website analytics are. People seem to theoretically like my blog, but am I offering my audience the value they deserve??? My feeling was “maybe not enough”. So through this “retreat” – a.k.a. 3 hours spent at my computer – I aimed to:

  • Update the site — make updates where necessary, delete pages where necessary, and generally make everything look its best
  • Analyze traffic — what posts really resonate with people (based on traffic to that particular post)? Which guest bloggers have driven the most people to the site? Where did those people come from (Twitter, LinkedIn, other websites)?
  • What am I going to do with this information???

I’m big on transparency and authenticity. If you’re reading this, I’d like to think you see value in this blog. If you’re a regular reader, I owe it to you to let you know that I’m working to make the blog better, and better for you – the regular reader – in particular. If you find X most valuable to you as a reader, I want to give you more of X. 

So what are some of my plans???

  1. Write a greater variety of styles of posts — I was chatting about this with soon-to-be What Gives’ guest blogger Andrew Littlefield. He encouraged me to mix up the style of my posts more. I was worried that the age of the article-style blog post is ending, but the better approach is to mix it up. So expect a mix of listicles, think pieces, content from guest bloggers, visual content/infographics, and more!
  2. Utilize LinkedIn more — I had no idea how much traffic could come to my blog from LinkedIn! I realized during my retreat that there’s a lot of unlocked potential here, so expect more content to be shared on LinkedIn.
  3. Use Twitter more / more strategically — I’ve always shared What Gives blog posts on Twitter, but I’m only just starting to use Twitter in a more strategic way: scheduling tweets, repeating tweets, etc. You should definitely tap into my Twitter feed if you haven’t already: @fundraisermaeve.
  4. Aim for higher quality in my posts — Sometimes I post something and think “I can do better than that”. I want to think that less often, so expect a more discerning approach to posting moving forward.
  5. Update What Gives’ branding — This is the lowest priority on my list, but I would like to do a bit of a re-brand / refresh of the What Gives brand, so expect that somewhere down the line.

So that’s it! Thank you for reading, and please keep holding me accountable for excellence in blogging!

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in educational fundraising for the past eight years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email

Guest Post: 5 TED Talks all Non-profit Leaders Should Watch

5 TED Talks All Non-Profit Leaders Should

I’ve been talking and writing a lot about leadership lately. It’s a topic I am incredibly passionate about – because we are never going to raise the money we need to raise if we don’t have good leaders who inspire their teams.

Regardless of our age, or experience level – we all need to spend as much time learning about leadership as we do fundraising.

With that in mind, here are my top 5 favourite TED talks that I think every non-profit leader (present and future) should watch:

  1. Simon Sinek: Why good leaders make you feel safe I am a HUGE fan of Simon Sinek. You probably know him from his book “Start With Why” – but it is this talk on the role of a leader that resonated with me. In 12 minutes, this TED talk succinctly summarized one huge problem with working in the non-profit world – we need to feel safe in our jobs to be truly successful.

“Great leaders are willing to sacrifice the numbers to save the people. Poor leaders sacrifice the people to save the numbers.” –Simon Sinek

  1. Dan Ariely: What makes us feel good about our work? What makes employees happy at work? Feeling like the work they are doing is making a difference. We need that to feel fulfilled in the work we do. IN FACT using salary to incentivise performance often has the exact opposite effect you want it to. Frankly, this is a video I wish I could force all fundraising directors, EDs and CEOs to watch Clockwork Orange style.

“There’s a mismatch between what science knows and what business does”
–Dan Ariely
   

  1. Susan Cain: The power of introverts In a world where many charities treat major gifts like it is the best kind of fundraising, Susan Cain’s messages are bang on for our sector.

“I worry that there are people who are put in positions of authority because they’re good talkers, but they don’t have good ideas. It’s so easy to confuse schmoozing ability with talent. Someone seems like a good presenter, easy to get along with, and those traits are rewarded. Well, why is that? They’re valuable traits, but we put too much of a premium on presenting and not enough on substance and critical thinking.” –Susan Cain

  1. Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen! How often does ego get in the way of good leadership? Too often in this fundraiser’s opinion. Being a great leader means you need to have the confidence to be vulnerable and LISTEN to your team.

“Nobody in this world can succeed alone” –Ernesto Sirolli

  1. Michael Norton: Money can buy happiness This TED talk has another powerful lesson on how to have happy, high performing teams: don’t spend money ON you team members – let them spend money helping each other.

“Teams that are pro-social sell more stuff” –Michael Norton

You’ll notice Dan Pallotta’s The way we think about charity is dead wrong isn’t on the list. Why? If you haven’t seen this TED talk, you may be living under a rock and I’m not sure this blog can help you. Just kidding, if you haven’t seen this one, it is also a must-watch.

That’s my list! What’s yours? Share your favourite TED Talk you think all non-profit leaders should watch in the comments below.

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Written by Rory Green

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Rory is a Senior Development Officer by day, and FundraiserGrrl by night. As a major gifts fundraiser, she connects donors with an opportunity to invest in a better future. FundraiserGrrrl is a blog about her cheeky observations about life in fundraising.

Three Years of What Gives Philanthropy and the launch of #WhatGivesWednesdays!

Happy 3rd Anniversary, What Gives Philanthropy!

I am so proud to dedicate this post today to celebrating the 3rd birthday (November 23rd) of this blog: www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com. 1095 days… 85 posts… 26 guest posts… Now that I think about it, the word “proud” hardly does it justice. I am delighted that I’ve continued to truck along with this blog for three years now, and that I’ve had so many of you reading what we – and I mean we – put out there for you. Thank you.

On the blog’s 2nd anniversary, I recommitted to excellence, but on its 1st birthday, I took the opportunity to change things up. This year, I’m going to do that again. It’s time for a change.

Why??? For two reasons. Firstly, it is healthy to mix your life up and try to take your endeavours to a new level when you have the opportunity to. Secondly, because Paul Nazareth told me to.

I’m partly kidding, but only partly. Paul Nazareth is a mentor of mine who I absolutely admire. I was lucky enough to see him for a coffee back in September and he encouraged me to do two things: (1) seek new opportunities for my blog, and (2) find a niche for myself. Now I didn’t want to arbitrarily assign myself a niche, so with his guidance, some introspecting, and by seeking advice from other friends/peers, my potential niche – or at least an area of interest – made itself clear: young donors. Or, how I’d prefer to refer to them as: young (non)donors.

I don’t want to go too far into the topic of young (non)donors yet, but here’s what I do want to tell you. We have a new initiative here at www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com: #whatgiveswednesday. This is going to be a year-long project to begin with, and we’ll see from there. We all know that we can’t ignore our youngest constituency, and we’re starting to learn a little more about them, but it’s still a bit of a mystery. My mission – and I hope you choose to accept it with me – is to crack this mystery!

Every other Wednesday (on the weeks I don’t already post), there will be a post by me or a guest blogger focused exclusively on young (non)donors. Why do they give? More importantly, why don’t they give??? What’s important to them? How can we engage them best now to ensure they stay engaged in the future?

Do not fear, the regular Friday posts will continue, but next week on Wednesday (November 26), you’ll see the first #whatgiveswednesday post and we’ll get started on our year-long mission.

Thank you for reading and I can’t wait to see what transpires in year four!

…oh! One other thing: posts will from here on in will never be longer than 500 words. I love that The Annual Giving Network always keeps their blog posts short and sweet, so I’m committed to doing that, too!

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in educational fundraising for the past seven years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email

The 5 Most Interesting Things I Learned on Day 1 of #AGCongress14

 

the 5 most interesting things I learned on day 1 of #AGCongress14

Ideally I would save this blog post for next week, but my sanity relies on routine, so I’ll stick with my regularly scheduled “every other Friday at 10:00 a.m.”.

What’s today’s post about? Well, right at this very moment I am in a session called “Picasso & Edison: Learn how to be both an artist and scientist in today’s fundraising world”, led by Samantha Laprade, CFRE (a.k.a. @GryphonReport). No, I am not blogging in front of her rather than paying attention to her session! I am writing this post from the comfort of my hotel room in Toronto on Thursday at 5:00 pm. I have just attended Day 1 of the 2014 Canadian Higher Education Annual Giving Congress in Toronto a.k.a. #AGCongress14. Yes, it’s me and dozens of other Annual Giving nerds talking about what we do and how we can be excellent at it. I’m in heaven!

So on that note, today’s post is the five most interesting things I learned yesterday on Day 1 of Congress. Here goes…

  1. STOP! Be stupidly creative. The very inspiring Joel Faflak of Western University started the day off by telling us to stop doing what you’re doing and do something mindlessly creative. Draw, see a musical, do something! Our creativity is being threatened by the business of our every day work, but we can’t stop cultivating it.
  2. Don’t solicit young alumni with the traditional academic segmentation. My friend Ryan Brejak of the University of Guelph (and a guest blogger for this site) delivered a great session on young alumni giving and stressed that millennials need to be segmented differently rather than by their faculty. Segment them by the non-academic affinities they have.
  3. Why would they care? I attended a panel about “How to Write for Development” and asked them what’s more important in a fundraising letter, to emphasize need or success. Chuck Chan of University of Toronto replied that it’s most important to focus on why the reader would care about this. Would they care about a dilapidated building, or would they care about what’s going to happen in a new one?
  4. There are three types of donors. I attended my mentor Paul Nazareth‘s session about planned giving and he outlined three types of donors: (1) the DNA donor, where giving is in their DNA, and so is your organization; (2) the academic, who values your institution because of how they turned what they learned into success; (3) and the trouble makers and weirdos who had a great time at your institution who will give back because of their experiences.
  5. Everyone should be an annual fund prospect all the time. The last session of the day was led by two fundraising powerhouses: Lorna SomersBob Burdenski. They talked about the worlds of major giving and annual giving colliding, and Lorna stressed that major gift prospects/donors should never be taken out of annual solicitations. They should always receive the calls, direct mailings, etc. and major gifts should “opt out” of this if really necessary, whereas the default will be that they’re solicited annually.

What a great day Day 1 was. I bet I’m already energized by Day 2 and it’s only 10:00 a.m.

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Written by Maeve Strathy

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Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in educational fundraising for the past seven years. Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Email