Guest Post: 8 tips to fire up your job search

8 tips to FIRE UP your job search!

 

So, you’re looking for a job? You are not alone, my friend. Whether you are thinking about making the transition into the world of fundraising or moving to a new city to be with the one you love, here are some tried and tested tips – by yours truly:

  1. Start with some soul-searching. Where do you see yourself in five years? What kind of fundraising job are you looking for? What are you passionate about? Know your strengths and let them guide you through the job hunting process.
  2. Check out your local job search sites. Here are a couple of my favourites: Charity Village, Indeed, and Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP). For AFP, stay connected with your local chapter. I’m in the KW area, so I keep my eye on the Golden Horseshoe chapter. Also, make a list of your top employers and keep checking their websites – you never know when that PERFECT job will be posted.
  3. Inspire yourself with motivational quotes. Each morning I would wake up and post them on my Facebook, as well as print them out and sprinkle them around the house. Don’t underestimate the power of positive thinking.

    Inspiration Board

  4. Network, network, NETWORK! My first week in Kitchener I attended an AFP networking mixer. Best. Decision. Ever! Everyone was super-friendly and very approachable, as you will soon see for yourself in the biz. “Your mission, should you choose to accept it” (too much cheese?) is to push yourself out of your comfort zone and make at least one new meaningful connection at each event. The fundraising world is a very small community, and you never know who can open a door for you in the future.
  5. Learn something new everyday. Read blogs, participate in webinars, attend meet-ups and conferences. I have been participating with the #DonorLove series since its inception, and that’s actually how I met Maeve! There are so many great resources out there to help grow your skills. They are also a great networking opportunity. Here are some other ones you may be interested in that I have/will be attending: The #DonorLove Rendezvous, AFP Fundamentals of Fundraising, and the Canadian Higher Education Annual Giving Congress.
  6. Interview preparation is key! You’ve landed an interview – YAY! Now it’s time to become an expert on the organization you’re interviewing with. If this is one of your dream employers from the list you’ve made (see #2), you’ve probably already spent countless hours reviewing their website and learning everything there is to know about them. One great piece of advice that I received from a friend was to make an online donation to the charity, and then talk about the experience and process in the interview. Thanks, Josh Bowman for this idea!).
  7. Asking for help is not a sign of weakness nor suggests that you are incompetent. It shows that you are taking the process seriously and that you are committed to putting your best foot forward. Ask a friend to help role play some potential interview questions. Ask your mentor(s) to review and provide feedback on your cover letter and resume. Speak to an employment service agent. I found all of these very helpful.
  8. Follow up! After your interview, send a thank you card to everyone involved to make a lasting impression. The ‘gold standard’ applies here, too, so be sure these are sent out within 24 hours. Also, a great question to ask at the end of the interview is their approximate timelines, and don’t be shy to touch base with them around that date.

While it may seem overwhelming at first, I promise you, with a little hard work and determination, it will all work out in the end.

Oh, and one more thing – remember to be yourself and enjoy the process.

Cheers!

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Written by Andrew Geekie

Andrew Geekie headshot
Andrew is a Development Coordinator with the Alzheimer Society Waterloo Wellington.

Connect with Andrew via:
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Guest Post: What Can Starbucks Teach Us About Fundraising?

 

What can Starbucks teach us about (1)

Today as I got my morning cappuccino, I noticed Starbucks is running a huge promotion – centred on buying beans, K-cups, syrups, cups and taking the Starbucks experience home.

Why would they do this? Isn’t the whole concept of drinking coffee at home Starbucks’ competition? Don’t they want me in their stores?

It’s because Starbucks has figured out something many charities haven’t tapped into yet: When you like something, you like doing it in different ways, and at different times.

I love going to Starbucks in the morning. I love chatting with the barista about my day as I grab my cappuccino. But I also love a cup of coffee in the office, a quick K-cup jolt in between staff meetings. I love a cup of decaf at 8 pm, enjoyed in my pajamas, on my couch. Having options makes me drink more coffee, not less.

If Starbucks was run like a charity, this promotion might not have happened. The director of In-Store Sales would be at the throat of the Director of K-Cup sales. “Those are MY customers, they come in the store every day – they get to know the baristas! It’s about relationships! K-Cups are a dumb fad you millennial idiot”… “No! In-store sales are dead! Convenience is the thing! K-Cups are the way of the future! MY customers want convenience, you dinosaur.”

As funny as that is, it is a sad reality for many charities – with annual giving, events, major gifts and planned giving all fighting over donors. “You can’t talk to event participants about monthly giving!” “Hey planned giving, back off my mid-level donors, you’re making them uncomfortable.” “Get out of here major gifts, no one invited you, you glory hog.”

It makes me sick.

When did we start thinking of this as a competition?

When did we become so entitled?

When did we start thinking we owned our donors? Like they are our property?

They are not YOUR donors, you are THEIR charity.

That means you have a responsibility to put aside the egos and the silos, and do what is best for the DONOR. You need to trust each other enough to help one another, and to make smart decisions about how to offer your donor the chance to give and be involved in all the ways THEY choose.

Because if your donors love your cause – the way I love coffee – they are going to choose to give in different ways, at different times and in different amounts.  Good customer service means you make sure those options and choices are there – when THEY want them.

Do you want to:

  • Understand how to overcome internal silos within your own organizations
  • See how four different organizations are leading the way in breaking down silos, driving integration, and thinking differently about their fundraising programs
  • Learn different strategies that you can incorporate into your own work to help address silo challenges in your own organizations

Then sign up for this webinar today: Breaking Down Silos: Great Ideas that Drive Integration & Results!

Out of the box creative is more than just a crazy concept from your Creative Director – creative innovation can help you connect with new audiences, help cement your relationships with the donors you already have and drive increased results. See how informed strategy and inspiring creative helps you to innovate and truly integrate channels and messages that resonate with your target audiences. See how you can break down internal silos and drive results for your own organization!

Seats are limited! SIGN UP NOW!

This post originally appeared on the GoodWorks Co Blog.

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Written by Rory Green

rory

 

Rory is a Senior Development Officer by day, and FundraiserGrrl by night. As a major gifts fundraiser, she connects donors with an opportunity to invest in a better future. FundraiserGrrrl is a blog about her cheeky observations about life in fundraising.

Connect with Rory via:
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**SPONSORED POST** Email maeve@whatgivesphilanthropy.com for more information about advertising on www.whatgivesphilanthropy.com.

Is this philanthropy?

I think my fellow fundraisers would agree that our feeling about philanthropy isn’t that you should try to give, give, and give to every organization that approaches you. In fact, my fellow fundraisers would probably say, “JUST SUPPORT OUR ORGANIZATION!” But I digress…

I just read a great piece by Julie Blais Comeau (a.k.a. @EtiquetteJulie) in the Huffington Post, entitled: “Sticky Situations: Saying No to Charity”. Thank you to my sister @arundelgibson for tweeting about this article.

In @EtiquetteJulie’s piece, she talks about the steady flow of requests for donations in her workplace – one colleague is doing a run for the cure, another has a child whose school is selling chocolate bars to fundraise… the list goes on. I’m sure this has happened to you, or something similar. Julie discusses appropriate ways to say “no” to your coworkers when this occurs, all of which are very tactful and helpful.

This article made me think about something I once heard James Fleck, Canadian businessman and philanthropist, say:

Philanthropy is balancing your passion and your resources.

Would you consider it philanthropy if you dropped a loonie into one of those Salvation Army collection boxes? Would you consider it philanthropy if you gave a homeless person your spare change? I’m not saying it isn’t helpful or worthwhile to do this, but I’m asking:

Is this philanthropy???

My thought is that I’d rather make one meaningful contribution per year to an organization that I feel passionately about, and that I want to invest in.

What do you think? Please comment here with your thoughts, ideas, and musings.

OR, even better, email me at maeve@whatgivesphilanthropy.com to discuss getting involved with What Gives??? as a guest blogger.  I’d love to have you on board!


Written by Maeve Strathy

Maeve is the Founder of What Gives Philanthropy and has been working in fundraising since 2007.

Click here to learn more about Maeve.

Connect with Maeve via:
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